Tag Archives: nonhuman

Studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in primates

For obvious reasons, studying neurogenesis in primates is useful. Primates are phylogenetically more related to us than rodents, and so understanding their nervous system can better help us to understand our own. For over a decade we have known that neurogenesis continues in adulthood in primates and in many ways, the process is similar to what has been observed in rodents. For example, neurogenesis is reduced with age in primates, is decreased by stress, increased in pathological conditions such as epilepsy, and increased by antidepressant treatment.

My goal in compiling this list was to assess the magnitude of adult neurogenesis in primates. It’s definitely more challenging than assessing the magnitude of neurogenesis in rodents, which we know much more about, and so I had put it off. At this point I haven’t reached a clear conclusion but, in quickly skimming these papers, the number of proliferating cells and/or new neurons averages thousand(s) of cells in the young adult primate hippocampus. The range is much much larger, and many studies cannot be easily compared due to variability in the methods, which is partly understandable since primates are scarce and are often used in multiple studies, thereby limiting the analyses that can be performed.


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